When it comes to mental health, we all respond to different stimuli. A change of diet can help one person, whereas a new hobby can help another, but when the usual advice doesn’t help, you might need to get inventive. Here are a few unique ideas from Find Your Flow to inspire you.

 

Dancing

With the recent popularity of TikTok, bedroom dancing has become a shareable hobby. If you’re a physical person who gets pleasure from using your body, then jiving to some upbeat music could give you the positive mental boost you need (even if you’re not sharing it online).

 

Tai Chi

Speaking of body movements, Tai Chi offers a slower, more meditative approach that will suit those who are trying to work through stress and anxiety in a more contemplative manner. If you’re new, take the time to learn a few basic techniques and apply these in a spacious setting or (if the weather provides) an open, outdoor area.

 

Bird Watching

If you have the patience and interest, bird watching can be an absorbing pastime for those based in rural environments. All you need is a good pair of binoculars and a field guide that you trust — the rest is about enjoying the outdoors and exploring the natural world at a leisurely pace.

 

Education

Your mood may be depressed because you don’t feel challenged enough in your current role. If that’s the case, returning to school to pursue an online degree may be just what you need. There are dozens of fields of study available, and online coursework means that scheduling is flexible to match your lifestyle.

 

Board Games

If you prefer to stay indoors and you have someone to share the time with, board games can be tremendously beneficial for mental health. Games like ‘Aggravation’ (despite its name) provide a way to zone out, socialize and entertain your mind without the use of screens.

 

Sporting Events

Spending time outside watching a game can be a great way to improve your mood. Try grabbing tickets for the LA Dodgers and taking a day trip to the ballpark. You can find great deals on great seats online. You’re sure to find the perfect spot to take in a game.

 

Charity Work

You may find that the best way to help yourself is to help others. There are always charity volunteering opportunities or you could try starting your own nonprofit — forming a nonprofit corporation will make it easier to apply for grants and public funding. A formation service can help you to navigate bylaws, which are written to explain how your corporation operates, its governance, board meetings, voting structure, and rules on conflicts of interest.

 

Fireworks

There is something mesmerizing about lighting a fuse and watching a multicolored explosion hundreds of feet above our heads. If you’re holding onto trauma, grudges or bad thoughts, try writing these down on paper and attaching them to your pyrotechnics before sending them up into the sky.

 

Light Therapy

For those of us who suffer from seasonal affective disorder (SAD), light therapy (or phototherapy) can have a profoundly positive impact. Using a lamp or specialized light therapy equipment, it’s possible to simulate sunshine and boost your production of melatonin, serotonin and vitamin D.

 

Skydiving

Mental health issues like depression and anxiety are often rooted in feelings of fear. If you want to tackle your mind’s worst demons head-on, there are few more direct methods than jumping out of a plane at 10,000 feet. Skydiving is generally a safe activity and many claim that taking the leap changed their lives in a permanent way.

The truth is, when it comes to mental health, there is no one size fits all approach. It’s important, therefore, to treat your mind for what it is — unique. In your quest for improved positivity rule nothing out and leave no stone unturned.

 

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